Weekend

Weekend Agenda: The Cooper Hewitt (by Sarah Archer)

This weekend, pay a visit to Jeweled Splendors of the Art Deco Era at The Cooper Hewitt -- a jewel of an exhibition that accompanies the museum's current blockbuster Jazz Age show. There are over 100 luxurious compacts, clocks, cigarette and cosmetic cases by the likes of Cartier and Van Cleef Arpels. This little wonder from 1929 is a Mystery Clock by Maurice Coüet and Cartier.

Maurice Coüet and Cartier, Mystery Clock, 1929

Maurice Coüet and Cartier, Mystery Clock, 1929

Weekend Agenda: I <3 John Giorno

In time for New York Gay Pride, a multi-venue show celebrating poet/artist/activist John Giorno opened at thirteen different sites throughout the city last night. Put on by Giorno's husband, the artist Ugo Rondinone, the site-specific installations include poetry, painting, and sound work. Plus, there is a calendar of performances scheduled through the end of July. I adore Giorno's work, and I can't wait to hit a bunch of the spaces! 

I &lt;3 John Giorno Locations

I <3 John Giorno Locations

John Giorno, I &lt;3 John Giorno Installation View

John Giorno, I <3 John Giorno Installation View

John Giorno, I &lt;3 John Giorno Installation View

John Giorno, I <3 John Giorno Installation View

John Giorno, I &lt;3 John Giorno Installation View, Red Bull Studios

John Giorno, I <3 John Giorno Installation View, Red Bull Studios

Weekend Agenda: Anselm Kiefer

Normally, when I go to Chelsea to visit galleries and do research for my clients, I'll spend the whole day and go to a huge list of about twenty shows. However, the current Anselm Kiefer exhibition at Gagosian is so big, spectacular, varied, and requires such close looking to really I enjoy, I recommend thinking of it as a museum show and making a special one stop Chelsea visit. The work on view includes paintings, artists’s books, and watercolors, referencing uncountable literary sources, and presenting an achingly beautiful vision of life and death, sensuality and spirituality. This show, on view through July 14th, is not to be missed. 

Anselm Kiefer: Transition from Cool to Warm, Artist Book, Gagosian Gallery

Anselm Kiefer: Transition from Cool to Warm, Artist Book, Gagosian Gallery

Anselm Kiefer: Transition from Cool to Warm, Artist Book, Gagosian Gallery (detail)

Anselm Kiefer: Transition from Cool to Warm, Artist Book, Gagosian Gallery (detail)

Anselm Kiefer: Transition from Cool to Warm, Installation View, Gagosian Gallery

Anselm Kiefer: Transition from Cool to Warm, Installation View, Gagosian Gallery

Anselm Kiefer: Transition from Cool to Warm, Gagosian Gallery

Anselm Kiefer: Transition from Cool to Warm, Gagosian Gallery

Anselm Kiefer: Transition from Cool to Warm, Gagosian Gallery

Anselm Kiefer: Transition from Cool to Warm, Gagosian Gallery

Weekend Agenda: The Met

I saw two shows at the Met recently that blew me away. The first is the Irving Penn retrospective. Known as a fashion photographer, Penn's body of work is actually big and varied, including truly sensitive portraits, still lifes, magazine covers, and travel images. Here are two favorites! 

Irving Penn, Modern Family, 1947

Irving Penn, Modern Family, 1947

Irving Penn, Glove and Shoe, 1947

Irving Penn, Glove and Shoe, 1947

Next, you must pay a visit to Sara Berman's Closet. This pint-sized period room is meticulously filled with clothes and assorted objects, including a jar of white buttons and a bottle of Chanel No 5. For me it was incredibly appealing because I love white on white, tidiness, and a minimalist lifestyle, but I think there's also something so intriguing about looking into this idiosyncratic and highly aesthetic personal space.

Sara Berman's Closet, Metropolitan Museum of Art

Sara Berman's Closet, Metropolitan Museum of Art

Sara Berman's Closet, Metropolitan Museum of Art

Sara Berman's Closet, Metropolitan Museum of Art

Sara Berman's Closet, Metropolitan Museum of Art

Sara Berman's Closet, Metropolitan Museum of Art

Weekend Agenda: What's Up New York

Lawrence Van Hagen has taken over an entire three story building in Chelsea to put on a fantastic pop-up gallery open through Saturday at 132 Tenth Avenue. What's Up New York includes work by both established and emerging artists, including these favorites of mine! 

Johnny Abrahams, Untitled IX, 2017

Johnny Abrahams, Untitled IX, 2017

Lee Bae, Issu du Feu, 2001

Lee Bae, Issu du Feu, 2001

Katherine Bradford, Swimming Pool, Long, 2017

Katherine Bradford, Swimming Pool, Long, 2017

Maximilian Magnus, Untitled, 2017

Maximilian Magnus, Untitled, 2017

Eddie Martinez, Cowboy Town Study #3, 2017

Eddie Martinez, Cowboy Town Study #3, 2017

Anthony Pearson, Untitled (Etched Plaster), 2016

Anthony Pearson, Untitled (Etched Plaster), 2016

Weekend Agenda: Venice Biennale

As the art season in New York winds down after this week, turn your eyes to Europe! If you, like me, aren't going to make it to Venice for the Biennale, how about a lazy Sunday looking at images online of all the amazing installations from 86 participating countries? The 57th Venice Biennale, which as the name suggests takes place every other year, opened on May 13 and will stay on view through November 26. Here are images of a few pieces that everyone is talking about! 

Lorenzo Quinn, Venice Biennale, 2017

Lorenzo Quinn, Venice Biennale, 2017

Ernesto Neto, Um Sagrado Lugar (A Sacred Place) at the Arsenale,&nbsp;Venice Biennale, 2017

Ernesto Neto, Um Sagrado Lugar (A Sacred Place) at the Arsenale, Venice Biennale, 2017

Anne Imhof, Faust, German Pavilion,&nbsp;Venice Biennale, 2017

Anne Imhof, Faust, German Pavilion, Venice Biennale, 2017

Musical stage by Xavier Veilhan, curated by Lionel Bovier and Christian Marclay, French Pavilion, Venice Biennale, 2017

Musical stage by Xavier Veilhan, curated by Lionel Bovier and Christian Marclay, French Pavilion, Venice Biennale, 2017

Damien Hirst,&nbsp;Treasures From The Wreck Of The Unbelievable,&nbsp;Venice Biennale, 2017

Damien Hirst, Treasures From The Wreck Of The Unbelievable, Venice Biennale, 2017

Weekend Agenda: SPRING/BREAK BKLYN IMMERSIVE

If you missed the Spring/Break Art Show in March, they have another... thing (I don't think it's quite an art fair) on view at Brooklyn's Citypoint daily (noon - 7pm) through Sunday. Large scale, site-specific and immersive installations by 12 artists are on view. Check it out! 

SPRING/BREAK BKLYN IMMERSIVE

SPRING/BREAK BKLYN IMMERSIVE

Weekend Agenda: Contemporary Art Fairs (Part II!)

It's so fun to take the ferry (from 35th or 90th Street) to visit the Frieze art fair on Randall's Island. I had a great time at the preview yesterday. Here are a few of my favorites! 

Liza Lou, ingxube (Mtwalume), 2015, Exhibited by Lehmann Maupin Gallery (with detail)

Liza Lou, ingxube (Mtwalume), 2015, Exhibited by Lehmann Maupin Gallery (with detail)

Sam Moyer, Untitled, 2017, Exhibited by Rodolphe Janssen Gallery

Sam Moyer, Untitled, 2017, Exhibited by Rodolphe Janssen Gallery

Dan McCarthy Vases, Exhibited by Anton Kern Gallery

Dan McCarthy Vases, Exhibited by Anton Kern Gallery

Wilhelm Sasnal, Kacper, 2016, Exhibited by Anton Kern Gallery

Wilhelm Sasnal, Kacper, 2016, Exhibited by Anton Kern Gallery

John Currin Salon Wall, Exhibited by Gagosian Gallery

John Currin Salon Wall, Exhibited by Gagosian Gallery

John Wesley, Untitled, 2011, Exhibited by Fredericks &amp; Freiser Gallery

John Wesley, Untitled, 2011, Exhibited by Fredericks & Freiser Gallery

Weekend Agenda: Contemporary Art Fairs

It's the last major Contemporary art fair weekend of the season in New York, and there is so much to see. Yesterday, I hit the TEFAF preview at the Park Avenue Armory. TEFAF is an incredibly elegant fair from The Netherlands, having its second ever edition in New York. Snapshots of some favorites below! In just a bit, I'm headed to the Frieze preview on Randall's Island, and then tomorrow Art New York. My weekend is packed with client appointments, but the fairs are open into the evening, and if you're thinking of buying work for your home, this is a great time to start. Please send me an email to make a date! 

Sheila Hicks, Prayer Rug, 1972, Exhibited by Demisch Danant Gallery

Sheila Hicks, Prayer Rug, 1972, Exhibited by Demisch Danant Gallery

Jean-Michel Basquiat, Untitled, 1983/1987, Wienerroither &amp; Kohlbacher Gallery

Jean-Michel Basquiat, Untitled, 1983/1987, Wienerroither & Kohlbacher Gallery

Ruth Asawa, Exhibited David Zwirner Gallery

Ruth Asawa, Exhibited David Zwirner Gallery

George Condo, The Pilot, 2012, Berggruen Gallery

George Condo, The Pilot, 2012, Berggruen Gallery

A Surrealist Banquet Installation, Exhibited by Di Donna Gallery

A Surrealist Banquet Installation, Exhibited by Di Donna Gallery

Galerie Gmurzynska Gallery Booth, Designed by Alexandre de Betak

Galerie Gmurzynska Gallery Booth, Designed by Alexandre de Betak

Cesar Domela, Composition neo-plastique no. 45, 1926, Exhibition by Dickinson Gallery

Cesar Domela, Composition neo-plastique no. 45, 1926, Exhibition by Dickinson Gallery

Live Oyster Shucker!

Live Oyster Shucker!

Weekend Agenda: Doug Wheeler at the Guggenheim

I think I would be a better person if I had a Doug Wheeler installation in my home that I could spend time in every day. Until that miraculous moment comes, there's one at the Guggenheim that can be experienced through August 2 (don't forget to buy your timed ticket in advance!). For the uninitiated: by manipulating space, light, and sound, Wheeler creates rooms with a sense of infinite space that are both disorienting and extraordinarily peaceful. I walk away feeling like my brain has had a spa day. 

Doug Wheeler, Installation, Guggenheim Museum

Doug Wheeler, Installation, Guggenheim Museum

Weekend Agenda: Editions Auctions Previews II

Trailing a week behind Phillips and Christie's, the editions preview is up at Sotheby's this weekend. Last week I talked about what kind of work is included in editions auctions and why I think they're great - read that here!  Some favorites from Sotheby's: 

Keith Haring, Dog, 1986, Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000&nbsp;

Keith Haring, Dog, 1986, Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000 

Paul Elie Ranson, Tigre Dans Les Jungles,&nbsp;1893, Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000

Paul Elie Ranson, Tigre Dans Les Jungles, 1893, Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000

Jean-Michel Basquiat (posthumous print), Untitled (Head), 2001, Estimate: $30,000 - 40,000

Jean-Michel Basquiat (posthumous print), Untitled (Head), 2001, Estimate: $30,000 - 40,000

Weekend Agenda: Editions Auctions Previews I

In anticipation of the auctions on April 18th, 19th, and 20th, the editions previews are up at Phillips and Christie's this weekend. In this context, editioned work can be anything except photography that's produced in multiples. Most of the pieces included in these sales are works on paper made with a printing technique such as screenprinting or lithography. However, these auctions also include three-dimensional sculpture! Sometimes my clients initially don't like the idea of a work that isn't unique, but they usually come around when I explain that this has nothing to do with posters. These pieces are produced in small numbers, often under the direction of the artist and always by a fine art printer. Buying editioned work is a great way to get something more affordable by a "blue chip" artist. Here are a few favorites from the upcoming sales. I have included the auction estimates in the captions to give you a sense of prices. If you would like to consider buying an editioned piece for your home, I would be happy to visit the previews with you this weekend. Sotheby's sale is a week later than Christie's and Phillips, so stay tuned for more next Thursday! 

Keith Haring, Best Buddies, from Pop Shop I, 1987, Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000

Keith Haring, Best Buddies, from Pop Shop I, 1987, Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000

Pablo Picasso, Head of a Woman in Profile, 1959, Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000

Pablo Picasso, Head of a Woman in Profile, 1959, Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000

Marlene Dumas, Super Model, 1995, Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000

Marlene Dumas, Super Model, 1995, Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000

Andy Warhol, Cheddar Cheese, from Campbell's Soup II, 1969, Estimate: $12,000 - 18,000&nbsp;

Andy Warhol, Cheddar Cheese, from Campbell's Soup II, 1969, Estimate: $12,000 - 18,000 

Sol LeWitt, Cube, 1979, Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000&nbsp;

Sol LeWitt, Cube, 1979, Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000 

Alexander Calder, Papoose, 1969, Estimate: $1,800 - 2,500

Alexander Calder, Papoose, 1969, Estimate: $1,800 - 2,500

Weekend Agenda: Chelsea Gallery Walk

There is a zero percent chance of rain on Saturday, and I have spring fever! One of my favorite activities is walking around Chelsea, checking out the latest gallery shows. I totally recommend it! Here's a few to catch. 

Meghan Riepenhoff: Littoral Drift at Yossi Milo Gallery, Installation view (Open through April 29)

Meghan Riepenhoff: Littoral Drift at Yossi Milo Gallery, Installation view (Open through April 29)

Yoshitomo Nara: Thinker at Pace Gallery (Open through April 29)

Yoshitomo Nara: Thinker at Pace Gallery (Open through April 29)

Les Lalanne at Paul Kasmin Gallery (Open through April 22)

Les Lalanne at Paul Kasmin Gallery (Open through April 22)

Weekend Agenda: The Photography Show

The AIPAD Photography Show is one of my favorite New York art fairs of the year. Although the exhibiting dealers are well vetted -- there are no tacky "art store" booths! -- there is a range of price points. Even cooler, you can see examples from the entire history of photography -- from daguerreotypes of civil war heroes to Bauhaus photograms to Contemporary work made days before the fair -- in one room. This year's edition has moved from the Park Avenue Armory to Pier 94, so it's bigger and better than ever! I spent all day yesterday at the preview. Below are just a few of the great pieces I saw. If you are thinking of purchasing photography for your home and would like to visit this fair with me this weekend, please get in touch! It's open through Sunday evening. 

Klea McKenna, Automatic Earth, 2016, Exhibited by Von Lintel Gallery

Klea McKenna, Automatic Earth, 2016, Exhibited by Von Lintel Gallery

Ellen Carey, Dings &amp; Shadows, 2013, Exhibited by Jayne H. Baum Gallery

Ellen Carey, Dings & Shadows, 2013, Exhibited by Jayne H. Baum Gallery

Wendy Small, Before the Details, 2016, Exhibited by Morgan Lehman Gallery

Wendy Small, Before the Details, 2016, Exhibited by Morgan Lehman Gallery

Ulrich Schmitt, Flower Studies, 2000-6, Exhibited by Galerie f5,6

Ulrich Schmitt, Flower Studies, 2000-6, Exhibited by Galerie f5,6

Weekend Agenda: Living with Art Preview

I love Christie's biannual Living with Art auctions! If you want to decorate your home in a traditional style or just mix in a few antiques, this is the place to look. The preview opens tomorrow and stays on view until the sales on March 28th and 29th. Here are a few of my favs! (Does anyone want to go in on the bird pictures with me? I don't really need all 22!) 

Louis XV-style walnut chair, Estimate: $1,500 – 2,000

Louis XV-style walnut chair, Estimate: $1,500 – 2,000

A set of 22 Ornithological Studies, Early Nineteenth Century, Estimate: $15,000 – 25,000

A set of 22 Ornithological Studies, Early Nineteenth Century, Estimate: $15,000 – 25,000

A French giltwood toubouret, Estimate: $2,000 – 3,000

A French giltwood toubouret, Estimate: $2,000 – 3,000

Hunt Slonem, Cockatoo (two works), 1995/6, Estimate: $2,000 – 3,000

Hunt Slonem, Cockatoo (two works), 1995/6, Estimate: $2,000 – 3,000

Weekend Agenda: Whitney Biennial

Every two years, The Whitney Museum puts on an large exhibition called the Biennial. It's a big deal because the show is known for encapsulating what's now and what's next. If you want to know what is driving artists today, and what the art world is going to be talking about tomorrow, a visit to the Biennial can help -- even if a lot of the work is not your cup of tea visually. Most editions exhibit many emerging artists, and inclusion can catapult an artist's career to the big league. 

The Biennial began in 1932, making it the longest-running show of its kind for American art. This -- the seventy-eighth edition -- is the first in the new Meat Packing District building.  The focus of many of the 63 included artists, perhaps not surprisingly, is on racial and economic inequality and political tension. Here are some highlights! 

Larry Bell, Pacific Red, 2016, Whitney Biennial 2017

Larry Bell, Pacific Red, 2016, Whitney Biennial 2017

John Divola, Abandoned Painting B, 2007,&nbsp;Whitney Biennial 2017

John Divola, Abandoned Painting B, 2007, Whitney Biennial 2017

Carrie Moyer, Glimmer Glass, 2016,&nbsp;Whitney Biennial 2017

Carrie Moyer, Glimmer Glass, 2016, Whitney Biennial 2017

Dana Schutz, Fight in an Elevator, 2015,&nbsp;Whitney Biennial 2017

Dana Schutz, Fight in an Elevator, 2015, Whitney Biennial 2017

Weekend Agenda: Uptown Gallery Walk

There are some great gallery shows right now in the elegant Upper East Side galleries. What better to do on a Saturday than have a stroll and take in some art. Galleries are free to enter, the exhibits are bite size, and you get fresh air and legs stretched in between. It's really my absolute favorite activity!

STOP ONE: Tadaaki Kuwayama & Rakuko Naito at Barbara Mathes Gallery (22 E 80) I often feel like art made out of little worked pieces of paper is fussy and fit only for Etsy, but Rakuko Naito's sculptural masterpieces are complex and lovely. They invite close viewing and hold the eye. 

Rakuko Naito, Installation view, Barbara Mathes Gallery (February 16 – April 21, 2017)

Rakuko Naito, Installation view, Barbara Mathes Gallery (February 16 – April 21, 2017)

STOP TWO: Andy Warhol: Self Portraits (Fright Wigs) at Skartstedt (20 E 79) Skarstedt is showing a great group of Warhol's self portraits. One of the things I love about seeing a set of his work like this is that you can compare both the little differences among them and how an aspect like color can change the mood between identical compositions. 

Andy Warhol: Self Portraits (Fright Wigs), Installation view, Skartstedt Gallery (February 23 - April 22, 2017)

Andy Warhol: Self Portraits (Fright Wigs), Installation view, Skartstedt Gallery (February 23 - April 22, 2017)

STOP THREE: Damian Loeb: Sgr A* at Acquavella Gallery (18 E 79) Like the first show, I could easily imagine views of the nighttime sky to be ticky-tacky, but Loeb's canvases are anything but. His masterful handling of paint and really magnificent skyscapes are hypnotizing and transporting. This show is simply gorgeous! 

Damian Loeb: Sgr A*, Installation view, Acquavella Gallery (March 3 - April 6, 2017)

Damian Loeb: Sgr A*, Installation view, Acquavella Gallery (March 3 - April 6, 2017)

Weekend Agenda: Mid-Season Auction Previews

The mid-season Contemporary auctions are next week! Which means this weekend there are awesome auction previews at all three of New York’s major auction houses: Christie’s, Phillips, and Sotheby’s. The mid-season auctions – in comparison to their big sibs in May – tend to be a bit more mellow and have more sleepers. If you’d like to consider bidding on a piece at auction, it would be my pleasure to tour some previews with you this weekend. Please get in touch! Here’s just a quick glimpse!

Andy Warhol, The Beatles, 1980, Christie’s, Estimate: $70,000 – 100,000

Andy Warhol, The Beatles, 1980, Christie’s, Estimate: $70,000 – 100,000

Glenn Ligon, (Miserable) Life #17, 2008, Phillips, Estimate: $15,000 – 20,000

Glenn Ligon, (Miserable) Life #17, 2008, Phillips, Estimate: $15,000 – 20,000

Nobuyoshi Araki, From Close to Range, 1991, Sotheby’s, Estimate: $40,000 – 60,000

Nobuyoshi Araki, From Close to Range, 1991, Sotheby’s, Estimate: $40,000 – 60,000

Weekend Agenda: Francis Picabia

The Francis Picabia retrospective at MoMA is a must see. It’s the most ambitious US exhibition of his work to date and includes material from all phases of his career.  As you march through the artistic moments of Picabia’s life, it’s hard to believe that all of the work was made by the same person. The styles he tries out include Impressionism, Modernist abstraction, Realism, and Dadaism. Whether you like all of the work or not—and in my opinion, some of it is just not very good—it’s an intriguing insight into the life of a modern painter in the first half of the twentieth century. My favorite Picabia work, and the pieces that have probably had the most attention in the art market, are his Monsters executed in the 1920s. These surreal, often-double exposed portraits of kissing couples have a quirky beauty that really sticks with me!

Francis Picabia: Our Heads Are Round so Our Thoughts Can Change, Museum of Modern Art ,&nbsp;  November 21, 2016 – March 19, 2017

Francis Picabia: Our Heads Are Round so Our Thoughts Can Change, Museum of Modern ArtNovember 21, 2016 – March 19, 2017

Weekend Agenda: Marilyn Minter

The Marilyn Minter show at the Brooklyn Museum is a knock out. These photorealist paintings are steamy and sensual, making this a great stop on a Valentine's Day date! Followed by dinner at Faun or Olmsted -- I can't imagine who wouldn't fall in love! And, if you find yourself thinking as much about the pictures as you are about your date, get in touch! Minter's work is available at several price points (she makes both unique and editioned pieces), and they look sensational in the home.

Marilyn Minter, Black Orchid, 2012, Chromogenic print, 86 x 57 inches   Marilyn Minter: Pretty/Dirty, Brooklyn Museum, November 4, 2016 – April 2, 2017

Marilyn Minter, Black Orchid, 2012, Chromogenic print, 86 x 57 inches
Marilyn Minter: Pretty/Dirty, Brooklyn Museum, November 4, 2016 – April 2, 2017