EmergingTalent

Tuesday Under Ten: Kristy Luck

Every Tuesday I post a work of art I love priced under $10K to support emerging artists and young galleries. This week: for those of us who missed the rising-star boat with Shara Hughes, let’s talk about these sensuous oil and wax on canvas pictures by Kristy Luck!

Kristy Luck, Fan, Flare & Eddy, 2019

Kristy Luck, Fan, Flare & Eddy, 2019

Tuesday Under Ten: Becky Kolsrud

Every Tuesday I post a work of art I love priced under $10K to support emerging artists and young galleries. This week: I saw these quirky portraits by Becky Kolsrud in the young gallery section of the Armory Show last week (exhibited by the Tif Sigfrids Gallery of Athens, Georgia), and they’ve really stuck with me. Watery and a little mysterious, I keep circling back to them, and I love how installed as a group, they invite comparison.

Becky Kolsrud

Becky Kolsrud

Becky Kolsrud

Becky Kolsrud

Becky Kolsrud

Becky Kolsrud

Tuesday Under Ten: Katherine Duclos

Every Tuesday I post a work of art I love priced under $10K to support emerging artists and young galleries. This week: Katherine Duclos’ new canvases are unbelievably good. In an exploration of her own artist materials, she is composing paintings from the collected scraps of previous work. They’re going to be featured in an upcoming show in British Columbia, so if you’re interested in grabbing one before they’re on view, please get in touch!

Katherine Duclos, 2019

Katherine Duclos, 2019

Katherine Duclos, 2019

Katherine Duclos, 2019

Katherine Duclos (detail)

Katherine Duclos (detail)

Tuesday Under Ten: Desire Rebecca Moheb-Zandi

Every Tuesday I post a work of art I love priced under $10K to support emerging artists and young galleries. This week: Open now at The Newsstand Project in Los Angeles — a gallery that exhibits emerging artists — is a fantastic show of woven wall hangings by Desire Rebecca Moheb-Zandi. I’m absolutely mad for these!

Desire Rebecca Moheb-Zandi, Transmutation, 2018

Desire Rebecca Moheb-Zandi, Transmutation, 2018

2018

It was such a joy to place so many wonderful works of art in 2018! Here are snippets of some of my favorites from the past year. Bringing art into people’s daily lives is the best part of my job, and I can’t wait to get back at it in January. If you’re interested in finding works of art for your home or office, please get in touch. Wishing everyone the best for the new year!

Tuesday Under Ten: Katherine Duclos

Every Tuesday I post a work of art I love priced under $10K. This week: the wonderful artist Katherine Duclos is offering this piece for $325 and giving a portion of the proceeds to refugee relief and a family center in Vancouver (where she lives). It’s a work on paper mounted to panel, and the sides are painted with gold mica. Love it! Please shoot me a note if you’re interested, and I’m happy to put you in touch with Kate!

Katherine Duclos, Rainbow Excavation, 2016

Katherine Duclos, Rainbow Excavation, 2016

Katherine Duclos, Rainbow Excavation, 2016

Katherine Duclos, Rainbow Excavation, 2016

Tuesday Under Ten: Diana Arge

Every Tuesday I post a work of art I love priced under $10K. This week: Over the weekend, I did the rounds for Gowanus Open Studios. One of my favorite things I saw was this beauty by Diana Arge. It’s composed of nine separate panels, so it can be rearranged to form different patterns. How fun is that? If you like it, please get in touch because it’s truly affordable, and I would love to find it a forever home!

Diane Arge, Lines, 2018

Diane Arge, Lines, 2018

Tuesday Under Ten: Rebecca Stern

Every Tuesday I post a work of art I love priced under $10K. This week: I just came across the lovely work of Rebecca Stern, and I’m enchanted — a little bit Paul Jenkins Abstract Expressionism and a little bit Color Field, these canvases have it going on!

Rebecca Stern, Here We Go Again, 2018

Rebecca Stern, Here We Go Again, 2018

Tuesday Under Ten: Vicki Sher

Every Tuesday I post a work of art I love priced under $10K. This week: I adore the graceful, casual lines of Vicki Sher's paintings, and for under $10,000, you can get a pair of these sizable canvases. I'm always happy to take people to see Tuesday Under Ten work in person if you're interested -- please get in touch! 

Vicki Sher, Dragonfly 3, 2016

Vicki Sher, Dragonfly 3, 2016

Tuesday Under Ten: One Year Anniversary

Every Tuesday for the past year, I have posted on my website and to social media, a work of art I love priced under $10,000. I find it rewarding to work with collectors who set a $10,000 annual budget and buy one piece a year, slowly building a thoughtful and meaningful collection over time. That said, if I counted on my under-$10,000 clients, I would not be able to earn a living as an art advisor. However, working with art at this price point is a way for me to give back to the art community.

In light of art market trends that have made it increasingly difficult for low to mid-market galleries to stay in business, support of emerging artists and artists whose works sells at a lower price point is particularly important right now. A shocking number of galleries have recently shuttered, including in the past two years in New York: Andrea Rosen, CRG, Feuer/Mesler, Kansas, Lisa Cooley, Lombard Fried, Mike Weiss, Mixed Greens, Robert Miller, and Tracy Williams. Sarah Douglas writing for Artnews, calculated that between 2012 and 2015 only 12 galleries closed, while since 2015 the number skyrocketed to 46, including 31 in the past year. These closures and the financial pressures faced by all but the biggest galleries are getting headlines in art publications and even in The New York Times. The articles blame growth of the international mega galleries (like Gagosian, David Zwirner, and Pace) alongside the increasing draw of the “trophy” artists they show. They also point to the breakneck speed of the nearly annual global art fair calendar and the rising rents in gallery areas like West Chelsea. I agree that these are significant factors in today’s art market, but I would like to suggest that both could present an opportunity rather than a problem.

First, yes — the value of artwork is often fetishized. Just about the only time the Contemporary art world gets a non-art publication headline is when a breath-taking price is achieved at auction. Art as commodity seems to grab interest over content and meaning. Although there’s been some pearl clutching about this journalistic phenomenon, I find it a source of hope. If thinking about dollars and cents catches attention in a way brushstrokes do not, then fine. My hope is that reading about a record price achieved for, say, a Basquiat, will lead the reader to turn to someone like me—an art advisor—to inquire what she could own that fits in her budget. There are plenty of people who can spend $10,000 or $50,000 a year, and there is nothing they can afford at Gagosian. The issue is reaching these collectors.

So, second, love them or hate them, art fairs across the world are packed, drawing people from many walks of life. And, with approximately 270 art fairs around the globe each year, there are 200 more than there were a decade ago. Fairs, however, are a huge financial gamble for a gallery. The starting price for a small booth at a second-tier fair, can be as much as $10,000 (and note, a big booth at a top drawer fair, can cost as much as $100,000). To do an art fair, a dealer must also pay for booth extras (walls and lights at a minimum), shipping the art, and airfare and hotels for staff. Undertaking these risks is often necessary to get work by your gallery artists in front of art-buying eyes.

As an art advisor, art fairs are invaluable tool for me. My clients are busy people for whom art buying is a secondary priority. As much as I know they enjoy looking at art with me, it often takes a backseat to professional and family demands. Since I have a hard time scheduling in-person viewing time with my clients, being able to show them a huge variety under one roof within a few hours is amazing. They can learn so much about what they like and what is available quickly. My clients often make multiple purchases in an afternoon that would have taken months with digital images and gallery visits. However, the less expensive the art work a gallerist sells, the harder it is to undertake the expense of an art fair. And, because galleries are taking on such tremendous costs, they are less likely to show work by their younger unproven artists, or artists whose pieces are at a lower price point.

The less a gallery is paying in rent, the more they can risk on an art fair, showing less expensive work by younger artists. I think dealers like Sasha Wolf (of Sasha Wolf Projects) and Candice Madey (of On Stellar Rays) have it right. They both closed their ground floor gallery spaces in favor of office showrooms so they have the time and resources to focus on art fairs and other one-off projects. For galleries I see the shift from a permanent brick and mortar location to art fairs to be an opportunity. The day-to-day staffing of a retail space is a drain on time and resources, and so often during the 10am to 6pm gallery day, there is not a single set of eyes taking in an exhibition. 65,000 pass through the Armory Show every year and over 70,000 visit Art Basel Miami Beach. It may be a four day exhibition, but the reach is far beyond what most galleries bring in for a show. By paying less rent every month, a dealer can do more fairs and take advantage of some to show riskier or less well-known and less expensive work.

So, why is this important? Sales allow artists to make art. Full stop. The value for me in promoting less expensive artwork is twofold. First, the ability for artists to earn a living by selling works of art allows their artistic practices to flourish. It is hard to make good work when you are an artist-slash-whatever and your studio time is tucked into evenings and weekends. Like any creative or philosophical pursuit, creating art requires time and concentration to pursue an idea and connect one thought to another. Second, I believe that living with good art—regardless of the cost—improves life, broadens perspectives, and stimulates thought. When a client tells me that they spend time every day with a piece I helped them purchase, I am thrilled. I hope that my “Tuesday under Ten” series helps people to think of art as something attainable rather than aspirational. Some of my clients do not have six-figure art-buying budgets, but that doesn’t mean they can’t live with wonderful works of art.

This article was also published on CultBytes.com

Alexa Williams and Crystal Gregory, Eve, 2016, handwoven cotton and concrete, 50 x 54 inches  Courtesy of the artists / Photo credit: Alexa Williams

Alexa Williams and Crystal Gregory, Eve, 2016, handwoven cotton and concrete, 50 x 54 inches

Courtesy of the artists / Photo credit: Alexa Williams

Peter Kayafas, North Dakota, 2010, Gelatin Silver print, 16 x 20 inches  Courtesy the artist and Sasha Wolf Projects, New York / ©Peter Kayafas

Peter Kayafas, North Dakota, 2010, Gelatin Silver print, 16 x 20 inches

Courtesy the artist and Sasha Wolf Projects, New York / ©Peter Kayafas

Ryan Nord Kitchen, Installation View at The Armory Show, 2017, Oil on linen, 24 x 21 inches each  Courtesy of the artist and Nicelle Beauchene Gallery, New York

Ryan Nord Kitchen, Installation View at The Armory Show, 2017, Oil on linen, 24 x 21 inches each

Courtesy of the artist and Nicelle Beauchene Gallery, New York

Senem Oezdogan, Momentum II, 2015, Wood, rope, and cotton, 24 x 18 inches  Courtesy of the artist and Uprise Art, New York

Senem Oezdogan, Momentum II, 2015, Wood, rope, and cotton, 24 x 18 inches

Courtesy of the artist and Uprise Art, New York

Bayne Peterson, Apollo, 2016, Dyed plywood, dyed epoxy, 14 3/8 x 8 x 7 1/4 inches  Courtesy of the artist and Kristen Lorello Gallery, New York / Photo credit: Jeffrey Sturges

Bayne Peterson, Apollo, 2016, Dyed plywood, dyed epoxy, 14 3/8 x 8 x 7 1/4 inches

Courtesy of the artist and Kristen Lorello Gallery, New York / Photo credit: Jeffrey Sturges

Tuesday Under Ten: Katherine Duclos

Every Tuesday I post a work of art I love priced under $10K. This week: I adore everything about Katherine Duclos' work, and it was such a pleasure to pay her a studio visit last week! She uses ink on yupo - a synthetic paper. Because the surface is waterproof, ink pours spread unpredictably before drying. By introducing metallic and reflective pigments, Kate is able to achieve truly spectacular effects. I also love that her work is produced in a series. You could do a grid of 8 for under $10,000 that could be rearranged to fit many spaces. If you're interested, please get in touch! 

Katherine Duclos, Installation view

Katherine Duclos, Installation view

Katherine Duclos, Installation view

Katherine Duclos, Installation view

Katherine Duclos, Installation view

Katherine Duclos, Installation view

Katherine Duclos, Studio view

Katherine Duclos, Studio view

Tuesday Under Ten: Adrian Kay Wong

Every Tuesday I post a work of art I love priced under $10K. This week: I am so into Adrian Kay Wong's flattened portraits. Stylish and often poignant, he depicts images of adolescence that strike a familiar chord. Starting at under $1,000, the price is relatable too. If you're interested in seeing these or any other Tuesday Under Ten work in person, please get in touch! 

Adrian Kay Wong, A Shoulder to Lean On, 2017

Adrian Kay Wong, A Shoulder to Lean On, 2017

Adrian Kay Wong, Cooly (Softies), 2016

Adrian Kay Wong, Cooly (Softies), 2016

Adrian Kay Wong, Close, 2017

Adrian Kay Wong, Close, 2017

Tuesday Under Ten: Crystal Gregory

Every Tuesday I post a work of art I love priced under $10K. This week: There is nothing I don't like about Crystal Gregory's cyanotypes. Delicate movement, vivid blue color, and interesting, entirely by-hand process - I adore this work! Technically photographs, the imagery in these pictures is derived from weavings Gregory, who has roots in fiber art, makes by hand. She also applies the light-sensitive emulsion to the paper herself, and many of the pieces use sunshine for the exposure. 

Crystal Gregory, Untitled, 2015

Crystal Gregory, Untitled, 2015

Weekend Agenda: What's Up New York

Lawrence Van Hagen has taken over an entire three story building in Chelsea to put on a fantastic pop-up gallery open through Saturday at 132 Tenth Avenue. What's Up New York includes work by both established and emerging artists, including these favorites of mine! 

Johnny Abrahams, Untitled IX, 2017

Johnny Abrahams, Untitled IX, 2017

Lee Bae, Issu du Feu, 2001

Lee Bae, Issu du Feu, 2001

Katherine Bradford, Swimming Pool, Long, 2017

Katherine Bradford, Swimming Pool, Long, 2017

Maximilian Magnus, Untitled, 2017

Maximilian Magnus, Untitled, 2017

Eddie Martinez, Cowboy Town Study #3, 2017

Eddie Martinez, Cowboy Town Study #3, 2017

Anthony Pearson, Untitled (Etched Plaster), 2016

Anthony Pearson, Untitled (Etched Plaster), 2016

Tuesday Under Ten: Cindy Hsu Zell

Every Tuesday I post a work of art I love priced under $10K. This week: I adore Cindy Hsu Zell's rope sculptures. A master of the art of gravity, Zell makes the rope in each piece by hand. Art doesn't have to be a picture in a frame, and I'm super into fiber art right now! Get in touch if you would like to hear more textile ideas for your home.

Cindy Hsu Zell, Grey Color Study, Arc, 2016

Cindy Hsu Zell, Grey Color Study, Arc, 2016

Cindy Hsu Zell, Installation view, Uprise Art, Affordable Art Fair 

Cindy Hsu Zell, Installation view, Uprise Art, Affordable Art Fair 

Tuesday Under Ten: Senem Oezdogan

Every Tuesday I post a work of art I love priced under $10K. This week: I paid a visit to the Uprise Art showroom last week looking for great art at affordable prices for my clients. These rope paintings by Senem Oezdogan were one of my favorites, and what’s even better is that you could do a row of three for under $10K. Please get in touch to learn about more of my favorite, affordable pieces!

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  Senem Oezdogan, Momentum II, 2015, Wood, rope, and cotton, 24 x 18 inches

Senem Oezdogan, Momentum II, 2015, Wood, rope, and cotton, 24 x 18 inches

Tuesday Under Ten: Katherine Duclos

Every Tuesday I show a work of art I love priced under $10K. This week: ink pieces by Katherine Duclos flow like liquid, and she has a varied practice, so there’s work for those who prefer color and geometry, as well! She’s having a studio sale this month. If you’re interested, please get in touch with me! 

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  Katherine Duclos, Chord, 2016, Ink on yupo, 26 x 40 inches

Katherine Duclos, Chord, 2016, Ink on yupo, 26 x 40 inches

Tuesday Under Ten: Kinda Khalidy

Every Tuesday I show a work of art I love priced under $10k. For my last TUT of the year: Sending 2016 out with a bang! And, wishing 2017 to be as exciting, fresh, energetic, and just a little out of control as a painting by Kinda Khalidy. I am completely enchanted by these! Haven't been able to stop thinking about this work for a week. If you would like to make a date to see any of the 2016 Tuesday Under Ten pieces with me, please get in touch! 

Kinda Khalidy, Untitled (#193), 2016, Mixed media on canvas, 52 x 52 inches

Kinda Khalidy, Untitled (#193), 2016, Mixed media on canvas, 52 x 52 inches

Tuesday Under Ten: Everest Hall

Every Tuesday I show a work of art I love priced under $10K. This week: I'm enraptured with Everest Hall’s paintings. Memento mori with dashes of postmodernism and color. If you would like to set up a studio visit with Everest, please let me know! 

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  Everest Hall, Three Paintings, Acrylic on Canvas, sizes various    
  
 
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Everest Hall, Three Paintings, Acrylic on Canvas, sizes various

Tuesday Under Ten: Crystal Gregory and Alexa Williams

Every Tuesday I show a work of art I love priced under $10K. This week I'm posting a recent collaboration between Crystal Gregory and Alexa Williams—a study in the contrast between tough and delicate, this work is cool cool cool. If you're interested in this work, it would be my pleasure to take you for a studio visit with Crystal and Alexa! 

Crystal Gregory and Alexa Williams, Phases 03, 2016, Woven textile and cement, 36 x 60 inches

Crystal Gregory and Alexa Williams, Phases 03, 2016, Woven textile and cement,
36 x 60 inches